Finest Man Booker Prize-Winning Novels

Finest Man Booker Prize-Winning Novels

The Booker Prize, previously known as the Man Booker Prize, holds the reverence of being the most prestigious annual international literary fiction tribute, extended to authors writing in English irrespective of their nationality. First awarded in 1969, Booker Prize is the commemoration of fiction in its supreme aesthetic form. These books influence a generation of passionate readers and spur the creative element in them.

The Remains of the Day

By Kazuo Ishiguro

This book speaks volumes about forfeited love and conventions in post-war Britain. The book is a modern classic pursues an English butler as he mirrors his past and grapples against the incarceration of his own vanity and self-contained nature. Ishiguro has been nominated four times and was the winner in 1989, showcasing his mastery in weaving words.

The Blind Assassin

By Margaret Atwood

An exemplary experiment with genre. This book furnishes its readers with intricate layers of stories woven within stories – a daring venture, yet typical of Atwood. Laura Chase, a gorgeous young woman from an affluent family, succumbed to death suddenly in 1945. Many years later, her older sister narrates their vicious secrets from their childhood and reveals the plot of a romantic science fiction tale that made Laura popular. This book is a compelling thriller of what had happened to these two women that lingered in their unsettling, abusive past.

The Blind Assassin

Midnight’s Children

By Salman Rushdie

An eerily elegant modern classic that weaves a charm over anyone who reads this engaging book. As a book in the Magic realism genre, it depicts the harmonious blend of magic and reality in every word. As a sovereign wordsmith, he uses every opportunity to juggle with the story that emanates from the catastrophic history of the dawning of the two nations of the Indian subcontinent. Born at the exact same second as the genesis of India and Pakistan, the protagonist, Salim Sinai, has his nemesis attached to his motherland.

White Tiger

By Arvind Adiga

White Tiger

A common man’s conundrum. The juxtaposition of the rich and the poor is painted with clarity through fierce words – the deplorable reality. This gaping gulf between the rich and poor is still the actuality. The raging gap in Indian society is portrayed with all verity in this book. The story begins with a self-made entrepreneur called Balram Halwai, who writes to the Chinese premier about his transcendence from rags to riches. The story then takes a twist when immorality is depicted as a necessary evil that saved him from dying a poor man’s life. The whole story is portrayed through the variance between Servant Class and Master Class, where the former is always unquestionably at a loss.

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